SmackBot: Add references section (testing) and/or general fixes.

September 13, 2007 at 1:31 pm (deathrock, wikipedia)

Add references section (testing) and/or general fixes.


? Older revision Revision as of 00:31, 14 September 2007
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|other_topics=[[List of classic deathrock bands|Classic Deathrock Bands (through 1990)]] – [[List of modern deathrock bands|Modern Deathrock Bands (1990-present)]] [[Goth]]
|other_topics=[[List of classic deathrock bands|Classic Deathrock Bands (through 1990)]] – [[List of modern deathrock bands|Modern Deathrock Bands (1990-present)]] [[Goth]]
}}
}}
”’Deathrock”’ (also spelled ”’death rock”’) is a term used to identify a [[subgenre]] of [[punk rock|punk]] rock and [[Goth]] which incorporates elements of horror and spooky atmospheres within a Goth-Punk style and first emerged most prominently in the [[West Coast of the United States]] and [[London]] during the late [[1970s]] and early [[1980s]].
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”’Deathrock”’ (also spelled ”’death rock”’) is a term used to identify a [[subgenre]] of [[punk rock]] and [[Goth]] which incorporates elements of horror and spooky atmospheres within a Goth-Punk style and first emerged most prominently in the [[West Coast of the United States]] and [[London]] during the late [[1970s]] and early [[1980s]].
The music of “modern” (post-1990) deathrock bands have a stronger [[post-punk]] influence than the earlier deathrock bands. Additionally, in the US, the term “deathrock” can be used as a synonym for first generation [[gothic rock]]. In the UK the terms were not interchangeable. Most of the early UK bands considered themselves to be punk, or goth, not deathrock -which at the time was an American based movement, though the term [[Batcave (London nightclub) | Batcave]] was and still is used by Europeans instead of, or along side Deathrock.
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The music of “modern” (post-1990) deathrock bands have a stronger [[post-punk]] influence than the earlier deathrock bands. Additionally, in the US, the term “deathrock” can be used as a synonym for first generation [[gothic rock]]. In the UK the terms were not interchangeable. Most of the early UK bands considered themselves to be punk, or goth, not deathrock -which at the time was an American based movement, though the term [[Batcave (London nightclub)| Batcave]] was and still is used by Europeans instead of, or along side Deathrock.
==Characteristics==
==Characteristics==
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==History==
==History==
===Etymology===
===Etymology===
The term “deathrock” was first used in the [[1950s]] to describe a thematically related [[genre]] of [[rock and roll]] called “death rock” which began in 1958 with Jody Reynold’s “”Endless Sleep”” <ref>[MMGuide.com]</ref> and ending in 1964 with J. Frank Wilson’s “”Last Kiss”” <ref>[Oldies.com]</ref>. These songs about dead teenagers were noted for their morbid yet romantic view of death, spoken word bridges, and sound effects. [[The Shangri-Las]]’ “[[Leader_of_the_Pack|Leader of the Pack]]” is arguably the best known example of the 50s/60s use of the term. <ref>[ClassicBands]</ref>.
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The term “deathrock” was first used in the [[1950s]] to describe a thematically related [[genre]] of [[rock and roll]] called “death rock” which began in 1958 with Jody Reynold’s “”Endless Sleep”” <ref>[MMGuide.com]</ref> and ending in 1964 with J. Frank Wilson’s “”Last Kiss”” <ref>[Oldies.com]</ref>. These songs about dead teenagers were noted for their morbid yet romantic view of death, spoken word bridges, and sound effects. [[The Shangri-Las]]’ “[[Leader of the Pack]]” is arguably the best known example of the 50s/60s use of the term. <ref>[ClassicBands]</ref>.
The term deathrock re-emerged 15 years later in [[1979]] to describe the sound of various West Coast punk bands which would later become associated with the deathrock scene and most likely came from one of two sources; [[Rozz Williams]], the founding member of [[Christian Death]], to describe the sound of his band <ref>[Starvox.net]</ref>, or the music press reusing the 1950s term to describe an emerging subgenre of punk. Another less popular theory is that the term came from [[Nick Zedd]]’s 1979 film “They Eat Scum”, which featured a fictitious cannibalistic “death rock” punk band called “Suzy Putrid and the Mental Deficients”<ref>[Verizon.net]</ref>.
The term deathrock re-emerged 15 years later in [[1979]] to describe the sound of various West Coast punk bands which would later become associated with the deathrock scene and most likely came from one of two sources; [[Rozz Williams]], the founding member of [[Christian Death]], to describe the sound of his band <ref>[Starvox.net]</ref>, or the music press reusing the 1950s term to describe an emerging subgenre of punk. Another less popular theory is that the term came from [[Nick Zedd]]’s 1979 film “They Eat Scum”, which featured a fictitious cannibalistic “death rock” punk band called “Suzy Putrid and the Mental Deficients”<ref>[Verizon.net]</ref>.
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This horror influence on rock music continued into the 1970s with theatrical hard rockers [[Alice Cooper]] <ref>[Canada.com]</ref> and [[Kiss (band)|Kiss]]. Rozz Williams has specifically credited the [[1970s]] output of both [[Alice Cooper]] and Kiss as childhood influences <ref>[TheBlueHour.fr]</ref>, [[45 Grave]] also covered Alice Cooper’s “”[[School’s Out (song)|School’s Out]]”” on their debut full length album.
This horror influence on rock music continued into the 1970s with theatrical hard rockers [[Alice Cooper]] <ref>[Canada.com]</ref> and [[Kiss (band)|Kiss]]. Rozz Williams has specifically credited the [[1970s]] output of both [[Alice Cooper]] and Kiss as childhood influences <ref>[TheBlueHour.fr]</ref>, [[45 Grave]] also covered Alice Cooper’s “”[[School’s Out (song)|School’s Out]]”” on their debut full length album.
Other rock and [[glam rock]] bands who influenced many early goth/deathrock artists include [[The Doors]], [[David Bowie]], [[The Velvet Underground]], [[The Stooges|Iggy Pop and the Stooges]], [[the Cramps]], [[T.Rex (band)|T. Rex]], [[New York Dolls]], [[the Damned]], [[MC5]], [[Richard Hell and the Voidoids]], etc. Most of these artists explored darker themes, sometimes incorporated horror-themed visuals into their shows, or had their music used in horror movie soundtracks. (For a more complete listing of influential artists, see [[List of forerunners of punk music|Punk Forerunners]] and [[Gothic_rock #Musical_predecessors_ .281960s.E2.80.931970s_or_Earlier .29|Gothic Rock predecessors]].)
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Other rock and [[glam rock]] bands who influenced many early goth/deathrock artists include [[The Doors]], [[David Bowie]], [[The Velvet Underground]], [[The Stooges|Iggy Pop and the Stooges]], [[the Cramps]], [[T.Rex (band)|T. Rex]], [[New York Dolls]], [[the Damned]], [[MC5]], [[Richard Hell and the Voidoids]], etc. Most of these artists explored darker themes, sometimes incorporated horror-themed visuals into their shows, or had their music used in horror movie soundtracks. (For a more complete listing of influential artists, see [[List of forerunners of punk music|Punk Forerunners]] and [[Gothic rock#Musical predecessors .281960s.E2.80.931970s or Earlier.29|Gothic Rock predecessors]].)
Horror movies also directly influenced deathrock artists. According to [[Dinah Cancer]], Italian horror movies were a large influence on [[45 Grave]]’s visual style <ref>[Deathrock.it]</ref>. Zombie movies influenced many deathrock artists, especially [[George Romero]]’s ”[[Night of the Living Dead]]” (1968) and its sequels. John Russo’s ”[[Return of the Living Dead]]” (1985) which featured [[Linnea Quigley]] and a mostly punk soundtrack<ref>[Amazon.com]</ref> influenced later deathrock bands. Horror-themed TV shows, such as ”[[The Addams Family]]”, ”[[The Munsters]]”, ”[[The Twilight Zone]]”, ”[[Dark Shadows]]”, etc., also provided some visual influence, as did spookily-clad horror movie hosts on TV such as [[Vampira]] <ref>[PartiGirl.com]</ref> in Los Angeles, [[John Zacherle]] in Philadelphia and New York, [[Elvira]] in Los Angeles (then later nationally), and [[Ghoulardi]] <ref>[EmpLive.org]</ref> in Cleveland.
Horror movies also directly influenced deathrock artists. According to [[Dinah Cancer]], Italian horror movies were a large influence on [[45 Grave]]’s visual style <ref>[Deathrock.it]</ref>. Zombie movies influenced many deathrock artists, especially [[George Romero]]’s ”[[Night of the Living Dead]]” (1968) and its sequels. John Russo’s ”[[Return of the Living Dead]]” (1985) which featured [[Linnea Quigley]] and a mostly punk soundtrack<ref>[Amazon.com]</ref> influenced later deathrock bands. Horror-themed TV shows, such as ”[[The Addams Family]]”, ”[[The Munsters]]”, ”[[The Twilight Zone]]”, ”[[Dark Shadows]]”, etc., also provided some visual influence, as did spookily-clad horror movie hosts on TV such as [[Vampira]] <ref>[PartiGirl.com]</ref> in Los Angeles, [[John Zacherle]] in Philadelphia and New York, [[Elvira]] in Los Angeles (then later nationally), and [[Ghoulardi]] <ref>[EmpLive.org]</ref> in Cleveland.
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==References==
==References==
  +
{{Reflist}}
{{punk}}
{{punk}}
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[[fr:Death rock]]
[[fr:Death rock]]
[[it:Death rock]]
[[it:Death rock]]
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[[nl:Deathrock]]
[[pt:Death rock]]
[[pt:Death rock]]
[[fi:Deathrock]]
[[fi:Deathrock]]
[[sv:Deathrock]]
[[sv:Deathrock]]
[[nl:Deathrock]]
 

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62.57.80.176: /* Characteristics */

September 13, 2007 at 8:16 am (deathrock, wikipedia)

Characteristics


? Older revision Revision as of 19:16, 13 September 2007
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The punk subgenres most closely related to deathrock are [[horror punk]] and [[psychobilly]]. While deathrock is a fusion of punk, post-punk and horror; horror punk is a fusion of punk, [[doo-wop]], and horror, and psychobilly is a fusion of punk, [[rockabilly]] and horror. Because of the strong influence of horror on these subgenres, there exists considerable overlap between the three genres.
The punk subgenres most closely related to deathrock are [[horror punk]] and [[psychobilly]]. While deathrock is a fusion of punk, post-punk and horror; horror punk is a fusion of punk, [[doo-wop]], and horror, and psychobilly is a fusion of punk, [[rockabilly]] and horror. Because of the strong influence of horror on these subgenres, there exists considerable overlap between the three genres.
Generally speaking, horror punk sounds louder and faster than deathrock. Conversely, deathrock sounds more introspective and romantic than horror punk. Keyboards are another differentiating point: deathrock bands frequently use keyboards for atmosphere, whereas horror punk and psychobilly bands usually do not. Psychobilly, however, is easier to distinguish from horror punk and deathrock because psychobilly bands normally use an upright bass <ref>[Epitaph.com]</ref>, whereas horror punk and deathrock bands do not.
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Generally speaking, horror punk sounds louder and faster than deathrock. Conversely, deathrock sounds more introspective and romantic than horror punk. Keyboards are another differentiating point: deathrock bands frequently use keyboards for atmosphere, whereas horror punk and psychobilly bands usually do not. Psychobilly, however, is easier to distinguish from horror punk and deathrock because psychobilly bands normally use an upright bass <ref>[Epitaph.com]</ref>, whereas horror punk and deathrock bands do not. os kero mucho
Despite the similar sounding names, deathrock (which is a subgenre of Post-Punk and Goth) has no connection to the similarly named [[death metal]], which is a subgenre of [[heavy metal]]. Deathrock is also not related to any other music genre with “death” in its name.
Despite the similar sounding names, deathrock (which is a subgenre of Post-Punk and Goth) has no connection to the similarly named [[death metal]], which is a subgenre of [[heavy metal]]. Deathrock is also not related to any other music genre with “death” in its name.

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65.2.113.225: /* Artists */

September 13, 2007 at 4:02 am (deathrock, wikipedia)

Artists


? Older revision Revision as of 15:02, 13 September 2007
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:”See also, [[List of classic deathrock bands|Classic Deathrock Bands]]” and ”[[List of modern deathrock bands|Modern Deathrock Bands]]”
:”See also, [[List of classic deathrock bands|Classic Deathrock Bands]]” and ”[[List of modern deathrock bands|Modern Deathrock Bands]]”
”[[Only Theatre Of Pain]]”, Christian Death’s 1982 debut album, is widely held as the first purely deathrock album <ref>[AllMusic.com]</ref> and cannot be easily classified as either a darker flavor of punk, horror punk, or post-punk. As a result, [[Rozz Williams]], the lead singer of [[Christian Death]], [[Shadow Project]], Premature Ejaculation, etc. is considered one of the most influential artists in the deathrock scene. Patrick Mata of [[Kommunity FK]] is another influential male deathrocker.
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”[[Only Theatre Of Pain]]”, Christian Death’s 1982 debut album, is widely held as the first American goth and deathrock album <ref>[AllMusic.com]</ref> and cannot be easily classified as either a darker flavor of punk, horror punk, or post-punk. As a result, [[Rozz Williams]], the lead singer of [[Christian Death]], [[Shadow Project]], Premature Ejaculation, etc. is considered one of the most influential artists in the goth and deathrock scene. Patrick Mata of [[Kommunity FK]] is another influential male deathrocker.
[[Dinah Cancer]] has been referred to as the Queen of Deathrock<ref> [DarkMoonEntertainment] </ref>, the Goddess of Deathrock <ref>[AntidoteRecords]</ref> and the High Priestess of Deathrock <ref>[Starvox.net]</ref> for her role as the frontwoman for [[45 Grave]] during a time when female lead singers were still considered somewhat of a rarity. Other influential female deathrockers would include [[Voodoo Church|Tina Winter]] and [[Eva O]].
[[Dinah Cancer]] has been referred to as the Queen of Deathrock<ref> [DarkMoonEntertainment] </ref>, the Goddess of Deathrock <ref>[AntidoteRecords]</ref> and the High Priestess of Deathrock <ref>[Starvox.net]</ref> for her role as the frontwoman for [[45 Grave]] during a time when female lead singers were still considered somewhat of a rarity. Other influential female deathrockers would include [[Voodoo Church|Tina Winter]] and [[Eva O]].

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62.97.163.104: /* See also */

September 11, 2007 at 5:45 am (deathrock, wikipedia)

See also

? Older revision Revision as of 16:45, 11 September 2007
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*[[Punk Rock]]
*[[Punk Rock]]
*[[Gothic Rock]]
*[[Gothic Rock]]
*[[Punk Subculture]]
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*[[Punk subculture]]
*[[Goth Subculture]]
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*[[Goth subculture]]
[[Category:Punk fashion]]
[[Category:Punk fashion]]
[[Category:Gothic fashion]]
[[Category:Gothic fashion]]

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62.97.163.104: /* See also */

September 11, 2007 at 5:45 am (deathrock, wikipedia)

See also

? Older revision Revision as of 16:45, 11 September 2007
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*[[Punk Rock]]
*[[Punk Rock]]
*[[Gothic Rock]]
*[[Gothic Rock]]
  +
*[[Punk Subculture]]
  +
*[[Goth Subculture]]
[[Category:Punk fashion]]
[[Category:Punk fashion]]
[[Category:Gothic fashion]]
[[Category:Gothic fashion]]

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Crescentia: /* Revival */ Record label should probably be put elsewhere.

September 9, 2007 at 3:17 am (deathrock, wikipedia)

Revival – Record label should probably be put elsewhere.

? Older revision Revision as of 14:17, 9 September 2007
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Nearly 20 years after deathrock and Batcave first appeared on the music scenes in Southern California and London, the deathrock [[revival]] began in Southern California. During 1998 in [[Long Beach, California]], owners of the Que Sera, a local bar, asked Dave and Jenn Bats, Jeremy “Jermz” Mesa, and friends, to throw a one-night “old school” Gothic Halloween party. After the success of the one-off party, the event quickly evolved into a regular deathrock club called Release the Bats [ReleaseTheBats.info] and a focal point in California for the reemerging deathrock movement. (The club is named after a song by the Australian band [[The Birthday Party (band)|the Birthday Party]].)
Nearly 20 years after deathrock and Batcave first appeared on the music scenes in Southern California and London, the deathrock [[revival]] began in Southern California. During 1998 in [[Long Beach, California]], owners of the Que Sera, a local bar, asked Dave and Jenn Bats, Jeremy “Jermz” Mesa, and friends, to throw a one-night “old school” Gothic Halloween party. After the success of the one-off party, the event quickly evolved into a regular deathrock club called Release the Bats [ReleaseTheBats.info] and a focal point in California for the reemerging deathrock movement. (The club is named after a song by the Australian band [[The Birthday Party (band)|the Birthday Party]].)
The current deathrock movement is similar to the original deathrock scene in Los Angeles and the Batcave movement in London [http://kisskissbangbang.bravehost.com/faq1.html KissKissBangBang.com], but more unified in the US, UK, and Europe through various record labels. In addition to clubs, the current scene is centered around concerts, special events, parties, and horror movie screenings, as well as bands like [[Cinema Strange]], [[Chants of Maldoror]], [[Tragic Black]], and [[Strobelight Records]]. The [[internet]] is playing a major role in the deathrock [[revival]]. There are [[websites]] devoted to the discussion deathrock [[music]], [[Band (music)|bands]] and [[fashions]] as well as horror movies, such as [deathrock.com] and [post-punk.com], plus [[Electronic mailing list|mailing lists]] for deathrockers on various online virtual communities, such as [[MySpace]].
+
The current deathrock movement is similar to the original deathrock scene in Los Angeles and the Batcave movement in London [KissKissBangBang.com], but more unified in the US, UK, and Europe through various record labels. In addition to clubs, the current scene is centered around concerts, special events, parties, and horror movie screenings, as well as bands like [[Cinema Strange]], [[Chants of Maldoror]], and [[Tragic Black]]. The [[internet]] is playing a major role in the deathrock [[revival]]. There are [[websites]] devoted to the discussion deathrock [[music]], [[Band (music)|bands]] and [[fashions]] as well as horror movies, such as [deathrock.com] and [post-punk.com], plus [[Electronic mailing list|mailing lists]] for deathrockers on various online virtual communities, such as [[MySpace]].
The deathrock/ Batcave movement in England is also growing quickly, particularly in [[London]]. Regular deathrock nights in the city, such as Dead & Buried (named after an [[Alien Sex Fiend]] song).
The deathrock/ Batcave movement in England is also growing quickly, particularly in [[London]]. Regular deathrock nights in the city, such as Dead & Buried (named after an [[Alien Sex Fiend]] song).

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90.193.240.172: all changes made are acurate.

September 9, 2007 at 2:49 am (clubs, deathrock, wikipedia)

all changes made are acurate.

? Older revision Revision as of 13:49, 9 September 2007
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Nearly 20 years after deathrock and Batcave first appeared on the music scenes in Southern California and London, the deathrock [[revival]] began in Southern California. During 1998 in [[Long Beach, California]], owners of the Que Sera, a local bar, asked Dave and Jenn Bats, Jeremy “Jermz” Mesa, and friends, to throw a one-night “old school” Gothic Halloween party. After the success of the one-off party, the event quickly evolved into a regular deathrock club called Release the Bats [http://www.releasethebats.info/ ReleaseTheBats.info] and a focal point in California for the reemerging deathrock movement. (The club is named after a song by the Australian band [[The Birthday Party (band)|the Birthday Party]].)
Nearly 20 years after deathrock and Batcave first appeared on the music scenes in Southern California and London, the deathrock [[revival]] began in Southern California. During 1998 in [[Long Beach, California]], owners of the Que Sera, a local bar, asked Dave and Jenn Bats, Jeremy “Jermz” Mesa, and friends, to throw a one-night “old school” Gothic Halloween party. After the success of the one-off party, the event quickly evolved into a regular deathrock club called Release the Bats [http://www.releasethebats.info/ ReleaseTheBats.info] and a focal point in California for the reemerging deathrock movement. (The club is named after a song by the Australian band [[The Birthday Party (band)|the Birthday Party]].)
The current deathrock movement is similar to the original deathrock scene in Los Angeles and the Batcave movement in London [KissKissBangBang.com], but more unified in the US, UK, and Europe through various record labels. In addition to clubs, the current scene is centered around concerts, special events, parties, and horror movie screenings. The [[internet]] is playing a major role in the deathrock [[revival]]. There are [[websites]] devoted to the discussion deathrock [[music]], [[Band (music)|bands]] and [[fashions]] as well as horror movies, such as [http://www.deathrock.com deathrock.com] and [http://www.post-punk.com post-punk.com], plus [[Electronic mailing list|mailing lists]] for deathrockers on various online virtual communities, such as [[MySpace]].
+
The current deathrock movement is similar to the original deathrock scene in Los Angeles and the Batcave movement in London [KissKissBangBang.com], but more unified in the US, UK, and Europe through various record labels. In addition to clubs, the current scene is centered around concerts, special events, parties, and horror movie screenings, as well as bands like [[Cinema Strange]], [[Chants of Maldoror]], [[Tragic Black]], and [[Strobelight Records]]. The [[internet]] is playing a major role in the deathrock [[revival]]. There are [[websites]] devoted to the discussion deathrock [[music]], [[Band (music)|bands]] and [[fashions]] as well as horror movies, such as [http://www.deathrock.com deathrock.com] and [http://www.post-punk.com post-punk.com], plus [[Electronic mailing list|mailing lists]] for deathrockers on various online virtual communities, such as [[MySpace]].
The deathrock/ Batcave movement in England is also growing quickly, particularly in [[London]]. Regular deathrock nights in the city, such as Dead & Buried (named after an [[Alien Sex Fiend]] song).
The deathrock/ Batcave movement in England is also growing quickly, particularly in [[London]]. Regular deathrock nights in the city, such as Dead & Buried (named after an [[Alien Sex Fiend]] song).

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Crescentia: I would just let drums be up there in stead of both because deathrock tends to use drums more frequently than drum machines.

September 5, 2007 at 4:20 am (deathrock, wikipedia)

I would just let drums be up there in stead of both because deathrock tends to use drums more frequently than drum machines.


? Older revision Revision as of 15:20, 5 September 2007
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|stylistic_origins=[[Punk rock]], [[Post-punk]], [[Glam rock]], [[Horror film scores]], [[Acid rock]]
|stylistic_origins=[[Punk rock]], [[Post-punk]], [[Glam rock]], [[Horror film scores]], [[Acid rock]]
|cultural_origins=Late [[1970s]], [[United States]], [[United Kingdom]], [[Australia]], [[Ireland]], [[Germany]]
|cultural_origins=Late [[1970s]], [[United States]], [[United Kingdom]], [[Australia]], [[Ireland]], [[Germany]]
|instruments=[[Vocals]], [[Guitar]], [[Bass guitar|Bass]], [[Drums]], [[Synthesizer]], [[Drum Machine]]
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|instruments=[[Vocals]], [[Guitar]], [[Bass guitar|Bass]], [[Drums]], [[Synthesizer]],
|popularity=Generally low although in the 1980s a few bands closely identified with deathrock music did have top 40 hits.
|popularity=Generally low although in the 1980s a few bands closely identified with deathrock music did have top 40 hits.
|derivatives= [[Dark cabaret]]
|derivatives= [[Dark cabaret]]

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Crescentia: /* References */ Spam

September 5, 2007 at 4:14 am (deathrock, wikipedia)

References – Spam


? Older revision Revision as of 15:14, 5 September 2007
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==References==
==References==
[http://www.myspace.com/stitches_cu Decayed Lace Radio]
 
<div>
 
<references/></div>
 
{{punk}}
{{punk}}

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Crescentia: Undid revision 155813308 by Throughbeingcool (talk)deathrock came before goth

September 5, 2007 at 4:12 am (deathrock, wikipedia)

Undid revision 155813308 by Throughbeingcool (talk)deathrock came before goth


? Older revision Revision as of 15:12, 5 September 2007
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|color=crimson
|color=crimson
|bgcolor=white
|bgcolor=white
|stylistic_origins=[[Punk rock]], [[Post-punk]], [[Goth Rock]], [[Glam rock]], [[Horror film scores]], [[Acid rock]]
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|stylistic_origins=[[Punk rock]], [[Post-punk]], [[Glam rock]], [[Horror film scores]], [[Acid rock]]
|cultural_origins=Late [[1970s]], [[United States]], [[United Kingdom]], [[Australia]], [[Ireland]], [[Germany]]
|cultural_origins=Late [[1970s]], [[United States]], [[United Kingdom]], [[Australia]], [[Ireland]], [[Germany]]
|instruments=[[Vocals]], [[Guitar]], [[Bass guitar|Bass]], [[Drums]], [[Synthesizer]], [[Drum Machine]]
|instruments=[[Vocals]], [[Guitar]], [[Bass guitar|Bass]], [[Drums]], [[Synthesizer]], [[Drum Machine]]

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