70.107.150.254: /* Related subcultures */

September 26, 2008 at 6:30 pm (Uncategorized)

Related subcultures


? Previous revision Revision as of 05:30, 27 September 2008
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* [[Punk subculture]]
* [[Punk subculture]]
* [[Goth subculture]]
* [[Goth subculture]]
 
==Others==
==Others==

From beyond the grave or from: Deathrock – Revision history

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70.107.150.254: /* Related subcultures */

September 26, 2008 at 6:29 pm (Uncategorized)

Related subcultures


? Previous revision Revision as of 05:29, 27 September 2008
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* [[Punk subculture]]
* [[Punk subculture]]
* [[Goth subculture]]
* [[Goth subculture]]
  +
==Others==
==Others==

From beyond the grave or from: Deathrock – Revision history

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Bluejay Young: /* Etymology */

September 8, 2008 at 11:11 am (Uncategorized)

Etymology


? Previous revision Revision as of 22:11, 8 September 2008
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==History==
==History==
===Etymology===
===Etymology===
The term “death rock” was first used in the 1950s to describe a thematically related [[genre]] of [[rock and roll]] which began in 1958 with Jody Reynolds “”Endless Sleep””<ref>[http://www.mmguide.musicmatch.com/artist/artist.cgi?ARTISTID=388439 MMGuide.com]</ref> and ended in 1964 with J. Frank Wilson’s “”Last Kiss””.<ref>[http://www.oldies.com/artist-view/J-Frank-Wilson.html Oldies.com]</ref> These songs about dead teenagers were noted for their morbid yet romantic view of death, spoken word bridges, and sound effects. [[The Shangri-Las]]’ “[[Leader of the Pack]]” is arguably the best known example of the 50s/60s use of the term.<ref>[http://www.classicbands.com/shangrilas.html ClassicBands]</ref> <ref>[http://www.nyx.net/~anon52ea/DeadTeenSongs.html Dead Teen Songs] Extensive website on the early death rock genre. Website found 2008-08-15.</ref>
+
The term “death rock” was first used in the 1950s to describe a thematically related [[genre]] of [[rock and roll]] which began in 1958 with Jody Reynolds‘ “”Endless Sleep””<ref>[http://www.mmguide.musicmatch.com/artist/artist.cgi?ARTISTID=388439 MMGuide.com]</ref> and ended in 1964 with J. Frank Wilson’s “”Last Kiss””.<ref>[http://www.oldies.com/artist-view/J-Frank-Wilson.html Oldies.com]</ref> These songs about dead teenagers were noted for their morbid yet romantic view of death, spoken word bridges, and sound effects. [[The Shangri-Las]]’ “[[Leader of the Pack]]” is arguably the best known example of the 50s/60s use of the term.<ref>[http://www.classicbands.com/shangrilas.html ClassicBands]</ref> <ref>[http://www.nyx.net/~anon52ea/DeadTeenSongs.html Dead Teen Songs] Extensive website on the early death rock genre. Website found 2008-08-15.</ref>
The term deathrock re-emerged 15 years later in 1979 to describe the sound of various West Coast punk bands which would later become associated with the deathrock scene and most likely came from one of three sources; [[Rozz Williams]], the founding member of [[Christian Death]], to describe the sound of his band,<ref>[http://www.starvox.net/crypt/dr/germany2.htm Starvox.net]</ref> or the music press reusing the 1950s term to describe an emerging subgenre of punk. Another theory is that the term came from [[Nick Zedd]]’s 1979 film “They Eat Scum”, which featured a fictitious cannibalistic “death rock” punk band called “Suzy Putrid and the Mental Deficients”.<ref>Hawkins, Joan ”Defining Cult Movies”. Pp 227-228. Manchester University Press (2003). ISBN 071906631X, 9780719066313. [http://books.google.com/books?id=cVVxu6D-ARgC&pg=PA227&lpg=PA227&dq=%22they+eat+scum%22+%22death+rock%22&source=web&ots=DdR-y2692J&sig=3aRSQDzbN_PmcKuGlsOJgbhy8Lg&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=8&ct=result]</ref>
The term deathrock re-emerged 15 years later in 1979 to describe the sound of various West Coast punk bands which would later become associated with the deathrock scene and most likely came from one of three sources; [[Rozz Williams]], the founding member of [[Christian Death]], to describe the sound of his band,<ref>[http://www.starvox.net/crypt/dr/germany2.htm Starvox.net]</ref> or the music press reusing the 1950s term to describe an emerging subgenre of punk. Another theory is that the term came from [[Nick Zedd]]’s 1979 film “They Eat Scum”, which featured a fictitious cannibalistic “death rock” punk band called “Suzy Putrid and the Mental Deficients”.<ref>Hawkins, Joan ”Defining Cult Movies”. Pp 227-228. Manchester University Press (2003). ISBN 071906631X, 9780719066313. [http://books.google.com/books?id=cVVxu6D-ARgC&pg=PA227&lpg=PA227&dq=%22they+eat+scum%22+%22death+rock%22&source=web&ots=DdR-y2692J&sig=3aRSQDzbN_PmcKuGlsOJgbhy8Lg&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=8&ct=result]</ref>

From beyond the grave or from: Deathrock – Revision history

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FortWhatever: /* Related genres */

September 3, 2008 at 10:19 am (Uncategorized)

Related genres


? Previous revision Revision as of 21:19, 3 September 2008
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* [[Experimental rock]]
* [[Experimental rock]]
* [[Psychedelic rock]]
* [[Psychedelic rock]]
  +
* [[Horrorcore]] (Hip-Hop)
==Subcultural fashion==
==Subcultural fashion==

From beyond the grave or from: Deathrock – Revision history

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IL7Soulhunter at 16:15, 18 August 2008

August 18, 2008 at 5:15 am (Uncategorized)



? Previous revision Revision as of 16:15, 18 August 2008
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|popularity=Generally low although in the 1980s a few bands closely identified with deathrock music did have top 40 hits.
|popularity=Generally low although in the 1980s a few bands closely identified with deathrock music did have top 40 hits.
|derivatives= [[Dark cabaret]], Mutant Punk
|derivatives= [[Dark cabaret]], Mutant Punk
|subgenrelist=List of musical punk genres
+
|subgenrelist=:Category:Death rock
|subgenres=None
|subgenres=None
|fusiongenres=
|fusiongenres=

From beyond the grave or from: Deathrock – Revision history

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Bluejay Young: /* Etymology */

August 14, 2008 at 7:50 pm (Uncategorized)

Etymology


? Previous revision Revision as of 06:50, 15 August 2008
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==History==
==History==
===Etymology===
===Etymology===
The term “death rock” was first used in the 1950s to describe a thematically related [[genre]] of [[rock and roll]] which began in 1958 with Jody Reynold’s “”Endless Sleep””<ref>[http://www.mmguide.musicmatch.com/artist/artist.cgi?ARTISTID=388439 MMGuide.com]</ref> and ended in 1964 with J. Frank Wilson’s “”Last Kiss””.<ref>[http://www.oldies.com/artist-view/J-Frank-Wilson.html Oldies.com]</ref> These songs about dead teenagers were noted for their morbid yet romantic view of death, spoken word bridges, and sound effects. [[The Shangri-Las]]’ “[[Leader of the Pack]]” is arguably the best known example of the 50s/60s use of the term.<ref>[http://www.classicbands.com/shangrilas.html ClassicBands]</ref>.
+
The term “death rock” was first used in the 1950s to describe a thematically related [[genre]] of [[rock and roll]] which began in 1958 with Jody Reynold’s “”Endless Sleep””<ref>[http://www.mmguide.musicmatch.com/artist/artist.cgi?ARTISTID=388439 MMGuide.com]</ref> and ended in 1964 with J. Frank Wilson’s “”Last Kiss””.<ref>[http://www.oldies.com/artist-view/J-Frank-Wilson.html Oldies.com]</ref> These songs about dead teenagers were noted for their morbid yet romantic view of death, spoken word bridges, and sound effects. [[The Shangri-Las]]’ “[[Leader of the Pack]]” is arguably the best known example of the 50s/60s use of the term.<ref>[http://www.classicbands.com/shangrilas.html ClassicBands]</ref> <ref>[http://www.nyx.net/~anon52ea/DeadTeenSongs.html Dead Teen Songs] Extensive website on the early death rock genre. Website found 2008-08-15.</ref>
The term deathrock re-emerged 15 years later in 1979 to describe the sound of various West Coast punk bands which would later become associated with the deathrock scene and most likely came from one of three sources; [[Rozz Williams]], the founding member of [[Christian Death]], to describe the sound of his band,<ref>[http://www.starvox.net/crypt/dr/germany2.htm Starvox.net]</ref> or the music press reusing the 1950s term to describe an emerging subgenre of punk. Another theory is that the term came from [[Nick Zedd]]’s 1979 film “They Eat Scum”, which featured a fictitious cannibalistic “death rock” punk band called “Suzy Putrid and the Mental Deficients”.<ref>Hawkins, Joan ”Defining Cult Movies”. Pp 227-228. Manchester University Press (2003). ISBN 071906631X, 9780719066313. [http://books.google.com/books?id=cVVxu6D-ARgC&pg=PA227&lpg=PA227&dq=%22they+eat+scum%22+%22death+rock%22&source=web&ots=DdR-y2692J&sig=3aRSQDzbN_PmcKuGlsOJgbhy8Lg&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=8&ct=result]</ref>
The term deathrock re-emerged 15 years later in 1979 to describe the sound of various West Coast punk bands which would later become associated with the deathrock scene and most likely came from one of three sources; [[Rozz Williams]], the founding member of [[Christian Death]], to describe the sound of his band,<ref>[http://www.starvox.net/crypt/dr/germany2.htm Starvox.net]</ref> or the music press reusing the 1950s term to describe an emerging subgenre of punk. Another theory is that the term came from [[Nick Zedd]]’s 1979 film “They Eat Scum”, which featured a fictitious cannibalistic “death rock” punk band called “Suzy Putrid and the Mental Deficients”.<ref>Hawkins, Joan ”Defining Cult Movies”. Pp 227-228. Manchester University Press (2003). ISBN 071906631X, 9780719066313. [http://books.google.com/books?id=cVVxu6D-ARgC&pg=PA227&lpg=PA227&dq=%22they+eat+scum%22+%22death+rock%22&source=web&ots=DdR-y2692J&sig=3aRSQDzbN_PmcKuGlsOJgbhy8Lg&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=8&ct=result]</ref>

From beyond the grave or from: Deathrock – Revision history

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Bluejay Young: /* Etymology */

August 14, 2008 at 7:46 pm (Uncategorized)

Etymology


? Previous revision Revision as of 06:46, 15 August 2008
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==History==
==History==
===Etymology===
===Etymology===
The term “deathrock” was first used in the 1950s to describe a thematically related [[genre]] of [[rock and roll]] called “death rock” which began in 1958 with Jody Reynold’s “”Endless Sleep””<ref>[http://www.mmguide.musicmatch.com/artist/artist.cgi?ARTISTID=388439 MMGuide.com]</ref> and ending in 1964 with J. Frank Wilson’s “”Last Kiss””.<ref>[http://www.oldies.com/artist-view/J-Frank-Wilson.html Oldies.com]</ref> These songs about dead teenagers were noted for their morbid yet romantic view of death, spoken word bridges, and sound effects. [[The Shangri-Las]]’ “[[Leader of the Pack]]” is arguably the best known example of the 50s/60s use of the term.<ref>[http://www.classicbands.com/shangrilas.html ClassicBands]</ref>.
+
The term “death rock” was first used in the 1950s to describe a thematically related [[genre]] of [[rock and roll]] which began in 1958 with Jody Reynold’s “”Endless Sleep””<ref>[http://www.mmguide.musicmatch.com/artist/artist.cgi?ARTISTID=388439 MMGuide.com]</ref> and ended in 1964 with J. Frank Wilson’s “”Last Kiss””.<ref>[http://www.oldies.com/artist-view/J-Frank-Wilson.html Oldies.com]</ref> These songs about dead teenagers were noted for their morbid yet romantic view of death, spoken word bridges, and sound effects. [[The Shangri-Las]]’ “[[Leader of the Pack]]” is arguably the best known example of the 50s/60s use of the term.<ref>[http://www.classicbands.com/shangrilas.html ClassicBands]</ref>.
The term deathrock re-emerged 15 years later in 1979 to describe the sound of various West Coast punk bands which would later become associated with the deathrock scene and most likely came from one of three sources; [[Rozz Williams]], the founding member of [[Christian Death]], to describe the sound of his band,<ref>[http://www.starvox.net/crypt/dr/germany2.htm Starvox.net]</ref> or the music press reusing the 1950s term to describe an emerging subgenre of punk. Another theory is that the term came from [[Nick Zedd]]’s 1979 film “They Eat Scum”, which featured a fictitious cannibalistic “death rock” punk band called “Suzy Putrid and the Mental Deficients”.<ref>Hawkins, Joan ”Defining Cult Movies”. Pp 227-228. Manchester University Press (2003). ISBN 071906631X, 9780719066313. [http://books.google.com/books?id=cVVxu6D-ARgC&pg=PA227&lpg=PA227&dq=%22they+eat+scum%22+%22death+rock%22&source=web&ots=DdR-y2692J&sig=3aRSQDzbN_PmcKuGlsOJgbhy8Lg&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=8&ct=result]</ref>
The term deathrock re-emerged 15 years later in 1979 to describe the sound of various West Coast punk bands which would later become associated with the deathrock scene and most likely came from one of three sources; [[Rozz Williams]], the founding member of [[Christian Death]], to describe the sound of his band,<ref>[http://www.starvox.net/crypt/dr/germany2.htm Starvox.net]</ref> or the music press reusing the 1950s term to describe an emerging subgenre of punk. Another theory is that the term came from [[Nick Zedd]]’s 1979 film “They Eat Scum”, which featured a fictitious cannibalistic “death rock” punk band called “Suzy Putrid and the Mental Deficients”.<ref>Hawkins, Joan ”Defining Cult Movies”. Pp 227-228. Manchester University Press (2003). ISBN 071906631X, 9780719066313. [http://books.google.com/books?id=cVVxu6D-ARgC&pg=PA227&lpg=PA227&dq=%22they+eat+scum%22+%22death+rock%22&source=web&ots=DdR-y2692J&sig=3aRSQDzbN_PmcKuGlsOJgbhy8Lg&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=8&ct=result]</ref>

From beyond the grave or from: Deathrock – Revision history

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Adrift*: /* Etymology */

August 4, 2008 at 1:54 am (Uncategorized)

Etymology



? Previous revision Revision as of 12:54, 4 August 2008
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The term “deathrock” was first used in the 1950s to describe a thematically related [[genre]] of [[rock and roll]] called “death rock” which began in 1958 with Jody Reynold’s “”Endless Sleep””<ref>[http://www.mmguide.musicmatch.com/artist/artist.cgi?ARTISTID=388439 MMGuide.com]</ref> and ending in 1964 with J. Frank Wilson’s “”Last Kiss””.<ref>[http://www.oldies.com/artist-view/J-Frank-Wilson.html Oldies.com]</ref> These songs about dead teenagers were noted for their morbid yet romantic view of death, spoken word bridges, and sound effects. [[The Shangri-Las]]’ “[[Leader of the Pack]]” is arguably the best known example of the 50s/60s use of the term.<ref>[http://www.classicbands.com/shangrilas.html ClassicBands]</ref>.
The term “deathrock” was first used in the 1950s to describe a thematically related [[genre]] of [[rock and roll]] called “death rock” which began in 1958 with Jody Reynold’s “”Endless Sleep””<ref>[http://www.mmguide.musicmatch.com/artist/artist.cgi?ARTISTID=388439 MMGuide.com]</ref> and ending in 1964 with J. Frank Wilson’s “”Last Kiss””.<ref>[http://www.oldies.com/artist-view/J-Frank-Wilson.html Oldies.com]</ref> These songs about dead teenagers were noted for their morbid yet romantic view of death, spoken word bridges, and sound effects. [[The Shangri-Las]]’ “[[Leader of the Pack]]” is arguably the best known example of the 50s/60s use of the term.<ref>[http://www.classicbands.com/shangrilas.html ClassicBands]</ref>.
The term deathrock re-emerged 15 years later in 1979 to describe the sound of various West Coast punk bands which would later become associated with the deathrock scene and most likely came from one of three sources; [[Rozz Williams]], the founding member of [[Christian Death]], to describe the sound of his band,<ref>[http://www.starvox.net/crypt/dr/germany2.htm Starvox.net]</ref> or the music press reusing the 1950s term to describe an emerging subgenre of punk. Another theory is that the term came from [[Nick Zedd]]’s 1979 film “They Eat Scum”, which featured a fictitious cannibalistic “death rock” punk band called “Suzy Putrid and the Mental Deficients”.<ref>[http://mysite.verizon.net/holyokeresearcher/ZEDD.html Verizon.net]</ref>
+
The term deathrock re-emerged 15 years later in 1979 to describe the sound of various West Coast punk bands which would later become associated with the deathrock scene and most likely came from one of three sources; [[Rozz Williams]], the founding member of [[Christian Death]], to describe the sound of his band,<ref>[http://www.starvox.net/crypt/dr/germany2.htm Starvox.net]</ref> or the music press reusing the 1950s term to describe an emerging subgenre of punk. Another theory is that the term came from [[Nick Zedd]]’s 1979 film “They Eat Scum”, which featured a fictitious cannibalistic “death rock” punk band called “Suzy Putrid and the Mental Deficients”.<ref>Hawkins, Joan ”Defining Cult Movies”. Pp 227-228. Manchester University Press (2003). ISBN 071906631X, 9780719066313. [http://books.google.com/books?id=cVVxu6D-ARgC&pg=PA227&lpg=PA227&dq=%22they+eat+scum%22+%22death+rock%22&source=web&ots=DdR-y2692J&sig=3aRSQDzbN_PmcKuGlsOJgbhy8Lg&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=8&ct=result]</ref>
===Origins===
===Origins===

From beyond the grave or from: Deathrock – Revision history

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78.148.162.184: pl:Death Rock

July 18, 2008 at 4:06 am (Uncategorized)

pl:Death Rock



? Previous revision Revision as of 15:06, 18 July 2008
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[[lt:Death Rock]]
[[lt:Death Rock]]
[[nl:Deathrock]]
[[nl:Deathrock]]
  +
[[pl:Death Rock]]
[[pt:Death rock]]
[[pt:Death rock]]
[[ru:???-???]]
[[ru:???-???]]

From beyond the grave or from: Deathrock – Revision history

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Twsx: fixing genre capitalization mistakes per WP:MUSTARD -> MOS:CAPS + cleanup.

July 15, 2008 at 8:30 pm (Uncategorized)

fixing genre capitalization mistakes per WP:MUSTARD -> MOS:CAPS + cleanup.


? Previous revision Revision as of 07:30, 16 July 2008
Line 53: Line 53:
By 1982, a wave of darker, more tribal post-punk bands had coalesced, influenced by punk rock, and the first-generation post-punk bands (and specifically the noisier 1980-81 post-punks [[UK Decay]], [[Killing Joke]], and [[Theatre of Hate]]). The primary bands in this new movement were [[Sex Gang Children]] and [[Southern Death Cult]]. Along with [[Brigandage]], [[Blood and Roses]], [[Ritual]], and others, they were dubbed “”positive punk”” by the UK press to differentiate them from other bands who were attempting to fly under the punk banner, such as the [[UK 82]] and [[Oi!]] acts. These positive punk bands featured tribal drumming, high-pitched vocals, scratchy guitar, and bass as melodic lead instrument, and a visual look blending glam with Native American-influenced warpaint and spiky haircuts, the first generation of the UK’s post-punk Goth bands.<ref>[http://www.scathe.demon.co.uk/punk.htm Punk<!– Bot generated title –>]</ref> Other related bands like [[Ausgang]], [[Inca Babies]], and [[Bone Orchard]] shared much of the tribal ethos and spiky look, but took more inspiration from [[The Birthday Party (band)|The Birthday Party]].<ref>[http://www.deathrock.com/boneorchard/links.html Bone Orchard<!– Bot generated title –>]</ref>
By 1982, a wave of darker, more tribal post-punk bands had coalesced, influenced by punk rock, and the first-generation post-punk bands (and specifically the noisier 1980-81 post-punks [[UK Decay]], [[Killing Joke]], and [[Theatre of Hate]]). The primary bands in this new movement were [[Sex Gang Children]] and [[Southern Death Cult]]. Along with [[Brigandage]], [[Blood and Roses]], [[Ritual]], and others, they were dubbed “”positive punk”” by the UK press to differentiate them from other bands who were attempting to fly under the punk banner, such as the [[UK 82]] and [[Oi!]] acts. These positive punk bands featured tribal drumming, high-pitched vocals, scratchy guitar, and bass as melodic lead instrument, and a visual look blending glam with Native American-influenced warpaint and spiky haircuts, the first generation of the UK’s post-punk Goth bands.<ref>[http://www.scathe.demon.co.uk/punk.htm Punk<!– Bot generated title –>]</ref> Other related bands like [[Ausgang]], [[Inca Babies]], and [[Bone Orchard]] shared much of the tribal ethos and spiky look, but took more inspiration from [[The Birthday Party (band)|The Birthday Party]].<ref>[http://www.deathrock.com/boneorchard/links.html Bone Orchard<!– Bot generated title –>]</ref>
During 1983, a related movement was brewing at a London [[Gothic Rock]] club called the [[Batcave (London nightclub)|Batcave]].<ref>[http://www.scathe.demon.co.uk/batcave.htm Scathe.Demon.co.uk]</ref> Initially envisioned as a venue specializing in [[glam rock]] and [[New Wave music|new wave]] musical acts, the two main bands which debuted and performed frequently at the Batcave, [[Specimen (band)|Specimen]] and [[Alien Sex Fiend]], developed their own different sounds strongly influenced by horror in British [[pop culture]], which set them apart from the rest of the glam and post-punk scenes in Britain. Also in 1983, [[The Gun Club]] toured in Europe<ref>[http://www.trakmarx.com/2005_02/09_gunclub.htm TrakMarx.com]</ref> as did [[Christian Death]]<ref>[http://www.projekt.com/projekt/product.asp?sku=TXX60016 Projekt.com]</ref> which meant the European [[gothic rock]] scene and the American deathrock scene were now able to directly influence one another.
+
During 1983, a related movement was brewing at a London [[Gothic rock]] club called the [[Batcave (London nightclub)|Batcave]].<ref>[http://www.scathe.demon.co.uk/batcave.htm Scathe.Demon.co.uk]</ref> Initially envisioned as a venue specializing in [[glam rock]] and [[New Wave music|new wave]] musical acts, the two main bands which debuted and performed frequently at the Batcave, [[Specimen (band)|Specimen]] and [[Alien Sex Fiend]], developed their own different sounds strongly influenced by horror in British [[pop culture]], which set them apart from the rest of the glam and post-punk scenes in Britain. Also in 1983, [[The Gun Club]] toured in Europe<ref>[http://www.trakmarx.com/2005_02/09_gunclub.htm TrakMarx.com]</ref> as did [[Christian Death]]<ref>[http://www.projekt.com/projekt/product.asp?sku=TXX60016 Projekt.com]</ref> which meant the European [[gothic rock]] scene and the American deathrock scene were now able to directly influence one another.
By 1984, the term “”positive punk”” was outdated, and the tribal positive punk bands, the various bands from the Batcave scene, as well as the bands from [[Leeds]] (such as [[The Sisters of Mercy]],<ref>[http://www.scathe.demon.co.uk/gotbands.htm ScatheDemon.co.uk]</ref> [[March Violets]], [[Red Lorry Yellow Lorry]], and others) some of which used drum-machines, had all come to be referred to as “”gothic””<ref>[http://www.scathe.demon.co.uk/histgoth.htm Scathe.Demon.co.uk]</ref> or [[gothic rock]].<ref>[http://mutantnation.com/underground/goth.asp MutantNation.com]</ref> The same year, California deathrock band [[Kommunity FK]] toured with UK [[Gothic Rock]] band [[Sex Gang Children]] (and the following year with [[Alien Sex Fiend]]<ref>[http://www.starvox.net/feat/kfk.htm Starvox]</ref>) which continued the trend in which American and British movements intermixed. Influenced more by the British scene and less by California, death rock bands began to form in other parts of the United States, such as [[Gargoyle Sox]] (1985) in [[Detroit, Michigan]], [[Shadow of Fear]] (1985) in [[Cleveland, Ohio]], and [[Holy Cow]] (1984) in [[Boston, Massachusetts]] (and later [[Providence, Rhode Island]]). The fertile [[New York]] scene featured [[Scarecrow]] (1984), [[Of a Mesh]] (1984), [[Chop Shop]] (1984), [[Fahrenheit 451]] (1984), [[The Naked and the Dead (band))|The Naked and the Dead]] (1985), [[Brain Eaters]] (1986), [[The Children’s Zoo]] (1986), [[The Plague]] (1987), and [[The Ochrana]] (1987).
+
By 1984, the term “”positive punk”” was outdated, and the tribal positive punk bands, the various bands from the Batcave scene, as well as the bands from [[Leeds]] (such as [[The Sisters of Mercy]],<ref>[http://www.scathe.demon.co.uk/gotbands.htm ScatheDemon.co.uk]</ref> [[March Violets]], [[Red Lorry Yellow Lorry]], and others) some of which used drum-machines, had all come to be referred to as “”gothic””<ref>[http://www.scathe.demon.co.uk/histgoth.htm Scathe.Demon.co.uk]</ref> or [[gothic rock]].<ref>[http://mutantnation.com/underground/goth.asp MutantNation.com]</ref> The same year, California deathrock band [[Kommunity FK]] toured with UK [[Gothic rock]] band [[Sex Gang Children]] (and the following year with [[Alien Sex Fiend]]<ref>[http://www.starvox.net/feat/kfk.htm Starvox]</ref>) which continued the trend in which American and British movements intermixed. Influenced more by the British scene and less by California, death rock bands began to form in other parts of the United States, such as [[Gargoyle Sox]] (1985) in [[Detroit, Michigan]], [[Shadow of Fear]] (1985) in [[Cleveland, Ohio]], and [[Holy Cow]] (1984) in [[Boston, Massachusetts]] (and later [[Providence, Rhode Island]]). The fertile [[New York]] scene featured [[Scarecrow]] (1984), [[Of a Mesh]] (1984), [[Chop Shop]] (1984), [[Fahrenheit 451]] (1984), [[The Naked and the Dead (band))|The Naked and the Dead]] (1985), [[Brain Eaters]] (1986), [[The Children’s Zoo]] (1986), [[The Plague]] (1987), and [[The Ochrana]] (1987).
===Irreconcilable differences===
===Irreconcilable differences===
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* [[Batcave (club)|Batcave]]
* [[Batcave (club)|Batcave]]
* [[Glam rock]]
* [[Glam rock]]
* [[Experimental Rock]]
+
* [[Experimental rock]]
* [[Psychedelic rock]]
* [[Psychedelic rock]]

From beyond the grave or from: Deathrock – Revision history

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